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Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)
down the iron curtain and changing the entry into the eu of those countries that lost so many of their use to communism. and contained in this history is the crucial point about britain, about our national character, about our attitude to europe. britain is characterized not just by its independence but above all, by its openness. we have always been a country that reaches out that turns its face to the world that leads the charge in the fight for free trade and against protectionism. this is britain today, as it's always been. independent, yes, but open, too. i never want us to pull up the drawbridge and retreat from the world. i am not a british isolationist. but i do want a better deal for britain. but not just a better deal for britain. i want a better deal for europe, too. so i speak as a british prime minister with a positive vision for the future of the european union. a future in which britain wants, and should want, to play a committed and active part. now, some might then ask, why raise fundamental questions about the future of europe when europe is already in the mi
responsibility and accountability. dook at the e.u. -- look at the e.u. did the e.u. destroy greece or did greece destroy the e.u.? it's probably both. but they both blame each other. all of this arises from intergovernmental corporation and commandeering. they have the example of commandeering in front of them. and we'll see the article of confederation and they wrote the constitution that prohibits this and makes it very, very difficult. the second objection to justice briar or the objection to the second part, well, if the feds wants to send a swarm of officers, let them try as language la already suggested they can't and they won't. and if they do they will have to pay the fiscal and the political price. so i think in a weird way it would actually be great if we have f.b.i. agents and in santa clara breaking down the doors of gravely ill pot smokers that will tell people more than the cato institute. one last point about this and i'll end. you see the force of the anti-commandeering rule and something that justin mentioned and that is the affordable care act. this seems far removed but it isn
administration via the ftc keep implementing companies' privacy 30eu8s as de facto regulations. the companies will have to keep to their word, essentially, on privacy. and as we have seen with companies like facebook and inthat gram, when they change their word, there are enough people using them, and we see a public b backlash, and then we see the companies often have to buckle and backtrack on some of these changes. that has moved much quicker than any regulation could. so for now, i think, it's going to be status quo. we're going to keep having ?epts that are going to -- incidents that are going to outrage the public, but i really don't think washington moves quickly enough to respond to some of these concerns. >> guest: well, i would say do not track there's been these sort of voluntary talks. big event at the white house, the advertising industry promised to come to the table and work this out, and that didn't happen. so there were law makers and regulators including chairman leibowitz at the ftc who have been saying, well, we're going to give the industry a chance to try this on its own
minister david cameron made a critical speech on the uk's rocky relationship with the eu. cameron proposed a bold referendum to allow british voters to decide whether or not to exit the alliance by 2016. >> there's no doubt we're more powerful than washington, delhi because we're a powerful player inside the union that matters for british jobs, and security. it matters to our ability to get things done in the world. it matters to the united states and other friends around the world, which is why many tell us clearly they want britain to remain in the european union. if we left the european union, it would be a one-way ticket, not a return. >>> let's take an early look at the markets. we'll get all up in your business this morning. steve sedgwick is live in london, which is still at this hour firmly part of the european union. >> and set to be for a bit longer. there was a huge caveat to what david cameron said there in that sound bite. he wants more competition in europe, more accountability, better growth and wants us to get out of the eurozone debt crisis. he wants to renegotiate with eu
the e.u. to impose sanctions on hezbollah, and you have been a believer that we should not do it alone, we should do with unilateral. what we do take the chance and urged the european union to sanction has a lot? is we shouldn insurer swer not be writing lesser proof, i think the president is the appropriate official. >> and congress has no interest in whether the e.u. would be sanctioned as a terrorist or a station? >> the congress has a responsibility in a lot of things. >> that me ask you this about the iranian revolutionary guard. he said a minute ago you think they are a terrorist recession. do you agree? bailout yes. >> and you voted against the amendment designating them as a terrorist organization because they are recognized as a state? iran, you would not want to designate the army of a recognized as a terrorist? >> i just clarify a statement on iran being a recognized nation by the nine nations, by most world bodies. the reason why i did not vote as 22 other members that because i think jim webb's argument was a strong argument, and that is we have -- and this is what he said
. defended dialogue with hamas. refused to join in a letter calling on e.u. to condemn hezbollah. he had a pejorative comment to jewish lobby. he has taken stances that indicateed he is less than supportive of the relationship with israel. >> there are two key democrats that could factor in how this goes. one is new york democratic senator schumer. >> he is staying quiet on the fight. talk about the real oppositio opposition. i think there will be some tough hurdles to get over with republicans. but i don't think there is enough democratic fight to stop the nomination. out of loyalty to the president who don't want him appointed will vote for him. >> bret: john kerry, fair to say he has an easy ride? >> yeah. it's an opportunity to get questions answered on benghazi or put it front and center in how the future of the state department will be run. no, i don't think there is any problem with him. >> bret: you agree, carl? >> it's interesting hearing. i agree that the committee means he gets approved but he will be asked about benghazi and about the basic tenets. and he will go on about the
, the eu are still our enemy. you should sign the paper you never leave sudan, never travel out of sudan, and never [indiscernible] and i did not. >> he refused? >> i refused to sign it. >> we still on the hunger strike? >> yes. >> they put in a feeding tube for you? >> [indiscernible] after i arrived in the sudan hospital. >> the ticket onto an airplane at guantanamo? they put you on a plane on guantanamo? >> yes. me and to the people from sudan -- two people from sudan. >> did they put back on your head? >> people from afghanistan. they took us from guantanamo and landing in baghdad, iraq. then they changed the aircraft and set me to sudan. we had another guy from morocco to sudan. >> when you landed in khartoum, was your family there? >> my family at that time was in doha, but they came to me. when i came to sudan, because i sat too long, but did not understand where i was. i did not feel anything. i opened my eyes and i find myself in the hospital in sudan. after five or six years, my wife and my son. >> did you recognize your son? >> of course. of course. by feeling, not by his face
of universities, law schools, international lawyers, ngos. everybody who works for the e.u. and so, my question would be a little more specific. what is the social base for the sovereignty movement and particularly, what are the elites in america, for example, that can be mobilized in order to resist and assert his father in view? >> i suppose the social base in places such as face and think tanks and activist. was probably the first effort of the movement back in the 1950s, which was promoted, the main promoter in 1855 is the american bar association, which was leading defender and they were close to senator john bricker of ohio, who introduced this amendment that's really complicated, but basically treaties could not trumpet and any treaties not self-executing but we can't congress and pass a lot implementing executive orders. so i've given toxic groups around the country. because activists are counteracted this or interested in american sovereignty on a wide range of issues, people who are conservative on agenda 21 and environmental issues and think there's an overreach by global environment
a strong u.k. and a strong e.u. so i'm wondering what the white house makes of the announcement today that there will be a referendum on that issue and what the united states has at stake in the u.k. staying part of the e.u. >> we welcome the prime minister's call for britain to remain in the e.u. and to retain a leading role in europe's institutions and as the president told the prime minister when they spoke last week, the united states values a strong united kingdom and a strong european union. we value our central relationship with the u.k. as well as our relationship with the european union which makes critical contributions to peace, prosperity and security in europe and around the world. we believe that the united kingdom is stronger as a result of its european union's membership and we believe the european union is stronger as a result of having the united kingdom in the e.u. so that's -- our views on this are very clear. the internal process by which these matters are considered within the u.k. or any other country are obviously the province of those countries and those gover
the sum total of all of your votes, refusing to sign a letter to the e.u. asking hezbollah to be designated a terrorist organization, being one of 22 to vote to guard terrorist terrorist organization, one of two to vote on sanction this body tried to make on iran and the statements you made after palestinians and about the jewish lobby, all of that together, that the image you created is one of sending the worst possible signal to enemies and friends at one of the most critical times in world history? >> i would not agree with that. if you had a chance tomorrow, today, after lunch, vote to say the iranian revolutionary guard was terrorist organization would you vote no? >> times change. it recognize that. yes, i would reconsider. >> thank you. that encouraging. >> bret: interesting exchange with lindsey graham. back with the panel. you talk about senator graham's exchange with chuck hagel. >> now that we have shown everyone how spontaneous and non-rehearsed we, are i was thinking of the tape where he quotes hagel saying the jewish lobby has intimidated senators in to voting
military efforts. >> of the eu have expressed their solidarity, both with mali and the intervention of france. all of my colleagues, without exception, have highlighted the full support the actions of friends and are thankful that france reacted so quickly. to quote the remarks of one of them, "witho, france, there would have been no mali." >> mali gained independence from france in 1960. more than 100 people have reportedly been stabbed, shot, or potentially burned to death by a massacre in the syrian city of homes. the attack in a poor area of the city's edge killed 106 people, some of them children, according to the britain-based syrian observatory for human rights. many homes were set on fire and some of the victims' bodies appeared to have been burned. it was unclear whether the attackers were part of the syrian army or members of a militia loyal to president bashar al-assad. widespread violence was reported thursday across syria, with continued bombings by government planes and clashes between troops and anti-government rebels. the obama administration is continuing its push
, intergovernmental cooperation destroys responsibility and accountability. look at the e.u.. did the e.u. destroy greece, or did greece destroy the e.u.? it's probably both, but you can't tell, and they all blame each other. and the founders didn't need the e.u. to see these dangers. all of this arises from intergovernmental cooperation and commandeering. the founders didn't need the e.u. because they have the example of commandeering in front of them. it was the articles of confederation. and so they wrote a constitution that prohibits this and makes it very, very difficult in any event. the second objection to justice breyer or, rather, the objection to his second point is, well, if the feds want to send swarms of officers, let them try. as angela already suggested, they can't, and they won't, and if they do, they will have to pay the fiscal and political price. so i think in a weird way it would actually be great if we had fbi agents in santa clara breaking down the doors of gravely-ill pot smokers. that'll tell people more about the federal government than 15 papers from the cato institute. [
trying to convince the e.u. to designate hezbollah as a global terrorist organization. this will be some interesting hearings and i think the senate will ask some pretty tough questions. jenna: to generalize that that that is interesting because it is about being able to name who our enmy -- enemies are in a broad context. general scales, senator kerry and senator hagel, both vets and supporters of the military and critics of the military as well. how do you have the two vets in high positions potentially? what would that mean? >> that's a great question. first of all i tend to support the person over the policy. i testified before senator hagel's committee in 2007 over the surge and i talked with him at length after my testimony. i will tell you this. one thing that struck me about him is enormous empathy for the american soldier. and as the military draws down he is going to be a person i think who maintains the trust and the compact that the government has with our returning veterans from iraq and afghanistan. so here's a buy who has seen war, who understands the nature and character
, but we now find that the eu court of justice is hindering progress by bringing into question the validity of the patents protecting research. on behalf of the millions of people in this country who suffer from long-term medical conditions, will the prime minister do what he can to clear this blockage? >> my honorable friend makes an extremely serious point. i will look closely at it, because i think this country has a competitive advantage from our having taken difficult decisions about stem cell research. it is important that we continue to lead in that area -- not only, as my honorable friend says, for economic and scientific reasons, but because we want to make sure that for people with long-term and debilitating conditions, for children with disabilities and other concerns, we crack those problems for the future. without that level of research, i do not believe that we shall. i will look very carefully at what my honorable friend has said and i will write to him with an answer. >> is the prime minister proud of the growth of food banks across this country, including in my constituency
to -- ountries that aspire to ascendancy in the eu. progress there will continue american leadership. i hope we will continue to work again to the region to ensure -- in the region to ensure that they continue to make progress. >> we will, senator. thank you for your leadership of the european foreign subcommittee. i look forward to working with a. -- you. >> senator kerry, i appreciate your thoughtful opening statement in response to these questions. i have a great deal of respect for your level of experience. i would've enjoyed working with you as a member of the committee. i will enjoy working with you as secretary of state. these are complex issues, these are dangerous times. i grew up helping politics at the water's edge and was true. -- hoping that that maxim that politics ends at the water's edge was true. i believe we share the same goals. we want a secure, prosperous america. i think that starts being open and honest with each other. i hate to go back to yesterday's news and by yesterday when i was asking a relatively simple question, secretary clinton's reaction was "what difference a
that aspire to ascendancy in the eu. progress there will continue american leadership. i hope we will continue to work again to the region to ensure they continue to make progress. >> we will, senator. thank you for your leadership of the european foreign subcommittee. i look forward to working with a. >> senator kerry, i appreciate your thoughtful opening statement in response to these questions. i have a great deal of respect for your level of experience. i would've enjoyed working with you as a member of the committee. i will enjoy working with you as secretary of state. these are complex issues, these are dangerous times. i grew up helping politics at the water's edge and was true. i believe we share the same goals. we want a secure, prosperous america. i think that starts being open and honest with each other. i hate to go back to yesterday's news and by yesterday when i was asking a relatively simple question, secretary clinton's reaction was i think it makes a big difference. i think it matters a great deal at the american people get the truth. i think they have the right to be told the
. you made a great point here, it is highly contagious, it's more contagious than the tphrao*eu. another thing it has in common with the flu is it changes rapidly it mutates. this year's strain is not the same as last year's strain. when you have a new strain you get twice as many cases. this is a very problematic thing. it's going to spread all over the country. i want the people out there to distinguish the symptoms. if you're feeling the vomiting, nausea, the diarrhea this is the n o noro virus. bill: you say it starts in utah. >> it's having huge out breaks in nursing homes and churches in utah. my guess is that somebody flew over from england or wales to utah bringing it there. plane flights spreads this incredibly rapidly. bill: if that is the case you have to wash your hands, man, that is your defense number one is it not? >> right, the flu is the respiratory virus. this one you get by touching sur tpaes, eac surfaces, touching food, you need to stay away from people when you're actually sick with this. bill: keep the fingertips out of your eyes. you see people doing that, that is
kerry would be a very effect t*eu secretary of state because he could carry out president obama's foreign policy position. he sailed he wouldn't pick him as secretary of state because they have a very different philosophy, bill. bill: we'll see if she mentions some of the more fiery hot spots on the globe today, she's been traveling a million miles, isn't that what she said yesterday. >> reporter: we heard a lot about her traveling more than a million miles as secretary of state. those of who who like hillary clinton were applauding her for her service and her going all over the world and others wanted to ask tough questions about benghazi. martha: i see elizabeth war warren at the table there. is she playing a roam? we are seeing new faces in the senate. >> reporter: i think she has an introduction here. do you want to listen in. martha: sure. >> i know will continue in the tradition of john quincy adams and christian herder as great secretaries from the commonwealth of massachusetts. although john learned more about diplomacy overseas and in the senate he'll be the first to te
pleated, we still have those countries that aspear to ascend ancy into the e.u. i would just urge you that further progress in that area is going to continue to require american leadership. i hope that we will continue to work in the region to ensure that they continue to make progress. >> we will, senator. i just want to thank you for your leadership of the european affairs subcommittee you've done a tremendous job working on it and i look forward to working with you. >> senator kerry, i appreciate your thoughtful opening statement and your thoughtful response to these questions. i have a great deal of respect for your global experience, your depth of knowledge in these areas. i would have enjoyed working with you as a member of the committee and i'm going to enjoy working with you as secretary of state. as you said, these are complex issues and these are dangerous times. i certainly grew up hoping that that maxim of politics ends at the water's edge was actually true. i'm not sure it ever was but it's something to aspear to. we have the same goals, we want a prosperous and secure am
and to the e.u., and i would just urge you that further progress in that area is going to continue to require american leadership, and i hope that we will continue to work in the region to ensure that they continue to make progress. >> we will, senator. and i just want to thank you for your leadership of the subcommittee. you've been absolutely terrific and i look forward to working with you. thanks. >> senator johnson. >> thank you, mr. chairman. senator, i appreciate your thoughtful opening statement and your thoughtful response to these questions. i have a great deal of respect for your level of experience, your knowledge in these areas and i would have enjoyed working with you as a member of the committee. i'm going to enjoy working with you as the secretary of state and i mean that in all sincerity. i want to have a close working relationship. as used in your opening statement, these are complex times. you know, i sort of grew up hoping that that maximum of politics at the water's edge was actually true. i'm not sure it ever was, but i think it's something we can aspire to. i truly think
ol skr*eus tha anesthesiologist that puts people to sleep and wakes them up for a living. they say consolidation is very important and it happens while we are sleeping. what is it? >> husbands can now use this as an excuse as to why they forgot to take the trash out because they didn't get a good night sleep. whaoeufpl we are sleeping the brain is working and it's working on over time to consolidate memories. what this means is that things that we encounter during the day, conscious or subconscious they get processed in networks or frame works within the brain. they get sorted based upon some common patterns and they also get stored and downloaded, similar to when you back up your computers. it's a process that will store all the memory that you need to have. jaime: let's say you're not a good sleeper. >> absolutely. jaime: how bad a shape are you in, then? jaime: what they've been showing is that the brain basically functions on delta waives during deep sleep and normally right now when we're talking we are having alpha and beta waves which are fast low voltage waves. when you get
at the e.u. level. we have been for investigation for it almost two years by the commissioner there and his staff. during this period, they comment from everybody and we give them literally millions of documents. we are busy negotiating with them. we don't think we violated any european laws, but we're happy to have the conversation and 're sort of now waiting on with a they decide to do. we have been negotiating back and forth and they have announced that publicly. in the united states, the law is similar but different if the way it's applied. in our indication, the government to have the federal trade commission look at this and a similar investigation is underway. there were a sers of hearings. i testified at the hearings and, again, i don't see the consumer arm under section 2 and we have asked the government to come back and give us the examples of things which are violations of law. we haven't seen that yet we are also in negotiations with them. that's probably all i should y. what i would say is we talk to these people a lot. we're waiting on them at some level. the ideal scenarioou
sessions already with our eu partners on doing exactly that. one interesting aspect you raised is those have not necessarily included the private sector or the critical infrastructure sectors. expanding the aperture to do that would make sense. >> in our last few minutes, thank you offer very important questions. secretary naplitano, as the content your future -- as you think about your future and some of the unfinished business, what is your highest priority? >> i think when i look at where i will be spending my time, aside from the management integration type issues, i think the coming immigration debate is something that we will be deeply involved in. we have deep and wide experience in those issues. cyber, we have already mentioned. then the constantly evolving types of terrorists threats and hamdi can better educate ourselves -- and how we can better educate ourselves, trained law enforcement, ascertain from history and otherwise what are better ways to identify behavior's indicate -- in take up potential violence, those are the things that concern me -- ways to identify and behavi
. -- that our current immigration system is not working effectively, indeed is 235eu8ing 0en 00 -- indeed is failing ton a daily basis cannot be denied. it needs to be fixed. it is a challenge for us to do so and will not be easy. i would, however, warn my colleagues that a framework is not a bill. and in 2006 and 2007 with the full support of the republican president of the united states, a bipartisan committee announced with great confidence that they had a plan that was going to fix our immigration system and we were all just going to line upped and vote for it much the masters of the universe had decided -- they'd meat in secret, they had all the special interest groups gather and they had worked out a plan that was going to change our immigration system for the better and we should all be most grateful. it came up with 2006, it did not pass. it came back again in 2007 with even more emphasis, and it failed coul loss -- and it failed colossally. it did not do it what they said it would do. it did not end the illegality. it did not set forth a proper principle of immigration for amer
Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)